Tag Archives: Beckett

Cover_SmallIt’s short, only 36 pages from start to finish. It’s called, Deep in the Grove, and it’s priced at a rock-bottom $0.99. One penny short of a dollar. I’m actually kind of proud about that.

The story is based on a real event, although it departs from reality early. In real life, I was present when two skeletons were removed from a sandy gravesite, hastily dug under cover of darkness deep in a citrus grove. That experience has lingered in my mind for several years. Visually compelling, emotionally wrenching, even olfaction comes into play when you stand beside a hole in the ground where bodies have recently been decaying. It’s impossible to forget. And so I decided to write about it in a highly fictionalized manner.

To be truthful, I initially thought about writing a non-fiction magazine piece detailing the actual killings. But the more I thought about it, the less appealing the idea become. I couldn’t find a way to write the story that didn’t feel slimy, sensationalist, and ultimately disrespectful of the two murdered girls. So I dispensed with the notion. Yet the experience of standing beside that hole in the ground, watching as their bones were recovered, witnessing the professionalism and care the crime scene investigators put into their grisly work – the memory kept nagging at me and nagging at me. Clearly the memory wasn’t going to go away easily.  Read More →

Screen shot 2014-02-18 at 7.10.37 PMSam Torode is simply amazing. His first novel, The Dirty Parts of the Bible, has outsold his wildest dreams. For a writer, that’s a big deal. As it should be.

The two of us became acquainted a couple years ago when I reached out and contacted Sam completely out of the blue. Thankfully, rather than calling the police to insist on a restraining order, Sam returned the favor, opening a line of communication that I have come to sincerely appreciate. In this discussion he’s unguarded  about his writing process, admits to an occasional bout with writer’s block, and expresses real surprise at the popularity of his debut novel. This episode of the podcast shows real insight into a true artist.

I’ve come to think a lot of Sam Torode and his work. If you haven’t read, The Dirty Parts of the Bible yet, please do. And click the link that will take you to a truly engaging conversation with a thoughtful, talented man. By the time the closing music plays, I think you’ll be glad you did.

Play