Tag Archives: Sci Fi

Lifeboat series 1

Publishing the Lifeboat Augusta series in e-book and audiobook formats was intentional. There is no hardcopy of the collection. Congratulations to those who have read the full story. You’ve been entertained  and you saved a small forest in the process.

Recently, Elizabeth Phillips, the narrator of the series, undertook recording a handful of marketing pieces designed to pique the interest of sci fi readers the world over. One of those snippets looks and sounds like this.

Another version came out slightly different.

Stay tuned to YouTube, Facebook, and where ever you find unique sci fi titles designed to pull you in and take you along for the ride. You never know what might happen next.

Jamie_05_3DTransparentAfter two years of sporadic but sincere effort, the Lifeboat Augusta series is finally concluded. With the release of installment 5, Survival of the Fittest, the story comes to an end…of sorts. There are no spoilers here. Only heartfelt appreciation for the readers who have been following along with the series and the support they’ve given me. Thank you. Truly.

Rather than leave it at that, brief as it is, I will share a bit of inside baseball with you. The literary edition.

One of the lesser known tasks undertaken when publishing a book, or an ebook, is the gathering of blurbs. These usually short, often flattering quips are written by other authors who have a thing or two to say about the story being presented. Fortunately, I have been on the receiving end of some high praise as I’ve put this series together. Authors I read and enjoy like John Blumenthal, Kevin Garrison, and C.G. Blake have been good enough to share their enthusiasm for the story in print. I very much appreciate the kindness.

With this last installment I asked another author whose work I enjoy to read and consider writing a blurb for the inside cover of, Survival of the Fittest. Sam Torode is a good man. I read his novel, The Dirty Parts of the Bible on a whim. Man, am I glad I did. Funny, quirky, totally believable and absolutely entertaining, Sam’s style of writing and his ability to weave a yarn through the dusty depression era midwest caught my imagination and held it.

We’re very different writers, Sam and I. Yet like cabinet makers, luthiers, potters, or tailors, we have an appreciation for each other’s work. Our work may take different forms and focus on different aspects of the human experience, but we each see something of value when we crack the pages of something the other wrote. That’s comforting, frankly. It’s satisfying too.

When I saw the blurb Sam submitted for inclusion in this final installment of the series, I was very pleased with the sentiment he shared. He said this, “Fans of apocalyptic fiction should check out Jamie Beckett’s Lifeboat Augusta series. This could be the next indie publishing sensation.”

How can I not be tremendously flattered by the appearance of those two sentences. You can see them for yourself, in context, inside the pages of, Survival of the Fittest. They’re right there beneath the blurbs of the other authors I mentioned previously.

If I ever succumb to the idea of starting each morning with a daily affirmation, I think Sam’s might be the message I would choose. It’s positive without being gushy. It’s supportive without bombast or hyperbole. Yet it made my day when I first read it, and it continues to brighten my mood each time I come across it.

With great appreciation to Sam, John, Kevin, and C.G. I must say, this has been an interesting journey. Shepherding Randy and Keisha and their peer group into orbit where they suffer one catastrophe after another, it’s been fun. On one level I wish it would never end. Then again, I’m enjoying the freedom I now have to move on to the next thing. The next story. The next book. Adventure awaits.

Oooo, I can’t wait to see what happens next.

David and JamieIt’s a fair question. What kind of an author stalks his own readers? Well, in my case it’s an appreciative one. It’s been my good luck to have dedicated readers who praise my work in public and bang on me regularly to write faster, finish the next project, and get it into their hands as quickly as possible. I love these folks. They make my work a more satisfying experience. They bring a smile to my face and a song to my heart. I’d be sunk without them, and so when the opportunity presents itself I have made it a practice to seek out enthusiastic readers and find a way to say, “Thank you” in a personal and hopefully meaningful way.

Most recently, I’ve been stalking David Nicholson. He’s a good man, an enthusiastic booster of my Lifeboat Augusta series of sci fi novellas, and he even plays the guitar in his down time. I appreciate his support so much I promised to dedicate the fourth novella of the series to him, which I did. When you flip through to the dedication page you’ll see his name right there. I wasn’t kidding.

What David didn’t expect was that I would depart from the ebook format for him and him alone. Just this once. With the release of, Binary Choices earlier this week, I took a single set of pages and a cover to a secret location and had the whole shebang bound for him. With the assistance of his sneaky and wonderful wife, Amanda Jo, I was able to track David down at a local Thai restaurant and pounce. I presented him with the only bound copy of, Binary Choices, and I got a big ol’ smile in return. That’s a perfectly fair trade in my book. See for yourself. We’re both pretty darned happy with the way things turned out.

Thanks David (and Amanda Jo, too). You’re the best!

 

BinaryChoices3DBinary Choices is the fourth installment of the five part Lifeboat Augusta series. It’s been written, edited, tweaked, re-edited, and is currently in the final stages of production. It will be released shortly to an audience of readers who have been patiently awaiting the next chapters of the story.

They will be pleased, surprised, and left hungry for more I’m sure.

Although much of my writing career has been focused on paper and ink, the Lifeboat Augusta series has not been. Occasionally I’m asked why. And so I’ll tell you.

Publishing has gone through two massive transitions in my life. First, it went from linotype operators and hot lead to the computer age. Edits were done without paper or pencil. The typewriter was replaced by the keyboard and an entire page could be laid out without setting a single letter into a steel form for the printer to use.

A few decades later the second change was to the publications themselves, not just the means of creating them. Ebooks came into being. No more paper, no more warehouses or delivery systems or stinky old trucks are necessary to produce a story and move it from the author’s desk into your hands. It’s all digital now. I like that. In fact, I like that development quite a bit.  Read More →