Tag Archives: Story

Have I ever mentioned how much I love Jane Waters Thomas? There are very few occurrences in my workday that are more enjoyable than spending time with Jane. She’s creative, adorable, curious, dedicated, and apparently indefatigable. Throw in a a few cameras, a production facility, and enough free to time really stretch out and talk about whatever crosses her mind, and you’re in for a good time. At least I was. I submit this video clip as evidence. Her interview in the Writers Den at PGTV is one of the more enjoyable interactions I’ve had while promoting my work. I only hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

On with the show!

Jamie_05_3DTransparentThe fifth and final installment of the Lifeboat Augusta series is nearing its release date. While it is in the final editing stage, this seems like the perfect time to let readers of the series know the end is near (or is it), and to say goodbye to a project that I’ve been working on for more than two years.

What a pleasure it has been.

This all started as a casual conversation about science fiction in its various forms. That led to a novella called, To the Lifeboats. Originally intended to be a stand-alone piece, it became apparent in the writing that a second and third installment would be necessary to flesh out the story and follow the main characters on a unique and occasionally terrifying  journey. That led to the creation of, Just About Armageddon and Isle of Safety. Yet before Armageddon was a complete first draft it was apparent even to me that Randy Tagget and Keisha Miller had more life in them than three novellas could contain.

In the end the Lifeboat Augusta series lived up to its promise of taking me on a fascinating adventure from earth to space and back again. Yet this adventure was somewhat more fraught with danger, intrigue, and yes even sexual tension than the Mercury 7 ever dreamed of.  Well, they might have dreamed it, but they were professional and tight lipped enough to keep it to themselves.

Watch Amazon for the release of the final installment of the series in October. It’s sure to grab you, throw you for a loop, and maybe even include a twist or two you weren’t expecting. But don’t dive in to installment five without getting a solid footing with installment one first. Start with To the Lifeboats, segue into Just About Armageddon, continue with Isle of Safety, go boldly into Binary Choices, then wrap the whole thing up with Survival of the Fittest.

Thanks for following along with the story as it unfolds. I’ve had fun. I sincerely hope you have too.

 

SmallCover_JPGAs the fifth and final installment of the Lifeboat Augusta series takes shape, I find myself in a particularly good mood. Reaction to the series has been terrific. I’ve received so many complimentary comments about the ebooks that I’ve decided to celebrate. Starting today and running straight through Sunday, June 29, To the Lifeboats, is being offered for FREE on Amazon. Just click the link, download your copy, and start enjoying the adventures of Randy Tagget, Keisha Miller, and the cast of characters who inhabit the Lifeboat Augusta.

It has been a real pleasure writing this series. I’m pleased to know so many readers have enjoyed the adventure so much and I have every confidence you will find the conclusion to be just as intriguing as the rest of this quirky out-of-this-world life or death drama. What a ride it’s been.

Hang tight, it’s not over yet. There’s more to come.

Screen Shot 2014-05-02 at 9.10.32 AMClaire North hits it out of the park with, The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August. Yes, this story traverses the years, the decades, the centuries experienced by one Harry August, an otherwise unremarkable man from the British Isles, save for one odd fact. He continues to live the same lifetime over, and over, and over again. Not the same life, mind you. Just the same lifetime. He is always Harry August, but his destiny is not fixed. It is flexible, inviting, terrifying, perplexing, dull, and invigorating. Whatever he wishes his life to be, it can be. But unlike the rest of us, he carries with him the memories of previous lives.

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Cover_SmallIt’s short, only 36 pages from start to finish. It’s called, Deep in the Grove, and it’s priced at a rock-bottom $0.99. One penny short of a dollar. I’m actually kind of proud about that.

The story is based on a real event, although it departs from reality early. In real life, I was present when two skeletons were removed from a sandy gravesite, hastily dug under cover of darkness deep in a citrus grove. That experience has lingered in my mind for several years. Visually compelling, emotionally wrenching, even olfaction comes into play when you stand beside a hole in the ground where bodies have recently been decaying. It’s impossible to forget. And so I decided to write about it in a highly fictionalized manner.

To be truthful, I initially thought about writing a non-fiction magazine piece detailing the actual killings. But the more I thought about it, the less appealing the idea become. I couldn’t find a way to write the story that didn’t feel slimy, sensationalist, and ultimately disrespectful of the two murdered girls. So I dispensed with the notion. Yet the experience of standing beside that hole in the ground, watching as their bones were recovered, witnessing the professionalism and care the crime scene investigators put into their grisly work – the memory kept nagging at me and nagging at me. Clearly the memory wasn’t going to go away easily.  Read More →

Isle_of_Safety_FlatMore than a few people have asked me why I chose to write a Sci Fi series. Well, the real reason I’ve been writing the Lifeboat Augusta series is included in the front matter of the books themselves. But the question intrigues me. It assumes that Sci Fi is somehow less important, or less serious than other forms of literature.

Let’s be realistic. In my case that means being fairly casual. You won’t find me sitting at my desk in a suit and tie unless it’s absolutely necessary. And it is rarely necessary, I assure you. Let’s dispense with serious terms like, “literature,” or “prose,” and even “author.” Let’s just simply take the position that I have chosen to tell a story. It might be a light-hearted romp, or it might be a dark murderous tale. Perhaps I would choose to tell a children’s story one night, and a sci-fi dramatic story the next. The point is, why would a writer intentionally limit their own imagination, or choose to self-censor the stories they choose to tell. The rationale for this escapes me. It’s inconceivable, really.

Imagine if we transferred that self imposed limitation to music or the visual arts. Would Picasso have been as exciting an artist if he stopped developing his style in his early 20s and simply repeated himself ad infinitum? I don’t think so. Would the Beatles have been more influential to the culture if they simply arrested their development in 1964, choosing to ride the wave of Beatlemania rather than innovate and experiment? No. Not hardly.  Read More →